Practitioners

Urban planners, public health leaders and business owners can all help people be active in their neighborhoods. Teachers, principals and school district directors can help children be active before, during and after school. Relying on evidence-based strategies in your work will help you be as effective as possible. Active Living Research has resources to provide practitioners with guidance on promising approaches for preventing obesity and promoting physical activity.

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Perceived urban neighborhood environment for physical activity of older adults in Seoul, Korea: A multimethod qualitative study

Date: 
10/01/2017
Description: 

Yoo S & Ha Kim D. (2017). Perceived urban neighborhood environment for physical activity of older adults in Seoul, Korea: A multimethod qualitative study. Prev Med. 103(Suppl), S90-S98.

Abstract: 

This study assessed the attributes of a perceived urban neighborhood environment for the physical activity (PA) of older adults by applying a qualitative multimethod approach to collect both descriptive and spatial information. Conducted in a northern community of Seoul, Korea, from April 2014 to November 2015, data collection methods included 90 walking tours by researchers, 46 face-to-face, semi-structured interviews combined with qualitative mapping with senior residents aged 65 +, 19 guided tours with the interviewees, and 3 focus groups with 12 community service providers. Thematic analysis and pattern finding were performed on the data. Walking was the main type of PA of the older adults. Nine attributes of perceived neighborhood environment for PA were identified under three themes: daily living (everyday life activities, mobility, social opportunities, diverse destinations); the multidimensionality of accessibility (physical, economic, psychosocial), and attractiveness and pleasantness (maintenance, aesthetics). The subcategories of the attributes included proximity, access to public transportation, walkability, cost-worthiness, low or no cost, familiarity, sense of welcoming, sociocultural appropriateness, fair access, order and upkeep, safety, openness, cleanliness, and interestingness. Strategies to generate more movement and activities in the everyday routine of the elderly should be a core task for health promotion and neighborhood design. A strategic application of multiple qualitative methods can create an opportunity to build contextual understanding and to generate ideas in interactions with the community.

Authors: 
Seunghyun Yoo, Dong Ha Kim
Location by State: 
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Urban density, diversity and design: Is more always better for walking? A study from Hong Kong

Date: 
10/01/2017
Description: 

Lu Y, Xiao Y, & Ye Y. (20107). Urban density, diversity and design: Is more always better for walking? A study from Hong Kong. Prev Med. 103(Suppl), S99-S103.

Abstract: 

Many cities in China have undergone rapid urbanization and are experiencing a decline in residents' physical activity levels. Previous studies have reported inconsistent findings on the association between 3D's (density, diversity, design) and walking behavior, and few studies have been conducted in China. The aim of this study was to identify the association between objectively measured 3D's and different domains of walking (transport vs. leisure) in Hong Kong, China. A survey was conducted in 2014 to collect walking data and relevant individual data from 1078 participants aged 18–65. The participants were randomly selected from 36 Hong Kong housing estates with different built environment and neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES). Built environment factors—population design, land-use mix and street intersection density—were assessed using a geographic information system. Multi-level regression was used to explore the associations between walking behavior and built environment factors, while adjusting for covariates. Two out the three D's—land-use mix and street connectivity—are not significantly related to any domains of walking. Furthermore, the third D, population density, is only positively related to walking for transport and walking for leisure in the lower range of density, while is negatively related to walking for leisure in the higher range of density. The findings suggest that the association between original 3D's and walking may vary in different urban contexts. The policy or planning strategy—using three D's to promote physical activity—may be ineffective or even counterproductive in large and already dense cities in China.

Authors: 
Yi Lu, Yang Xiao, Yu Ye
Location by State: 
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Community Guide Task Force Recommends Built Environment Interventions to Increase Physical Activity

The Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends combined built environment approaches to increase physical activity. These approaches combine new or enhanced transportation systems (e.g., pedestrian and cycling paths) with new or enhanced land use design (e.g., proximity to a store, access to a public park) to promote physical activity among residents.

The 2016 Active Living Research Conference: Equity in Active Living

Date: 
02/01/2017
Description: 

Keith, N.R., Baskin, M.L., Wilhelm Stanis, S.A., & Sallis, J.F. (2017). The 2016 Active Living Research Conference: Equity in Active Living. Prev Med. 95(Suppl), S1-S3.

Authors: 
NR Keith, ML Baskin, SA Wilhelm Stanis, & JF Sallis
Location by State: 

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