Practitioners

Urban planners, public health leaders and business owners can all help people be active in their neighborhoods. Teachers, principals and school district directors can help children be active before, during and after school. Relying on evidence-based strategies in your work will help you be as effective as possible. Active Living Research has resources to provide practitioners with guidance on promising approaches for preventing obesity and promoting physical activity.

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Ready for Recess: Changing Policy and Practice to Support Students' Physical Activity

This is part one of a two-part Web Forum series designed to promote more physically active recess in schools. Click here for part 2.

Part one is intended for school administrators, public health practitioners (e.g. school wellness coordinators), and parents who want to learn how to influence policies and practices that support the overall health and well-being of students.

Developing the Ingredients Necessary for Successful Cross-Sector Collaboration: Where Research Meets Practice

Description: 

Workshop at the 2013 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Date: 
02/26/2013
Abstract: 

Initiatives to institute environmental and policy change in communities, to reduce obesity and promote active living, call for the participation of multiple stakeholder groups. These initiatives not only require collaboration across disciplines, but across cultural communities as well. Building relationships is important, but what factors are key in determining the success of a collaborative effort? Participants explored promising practices for building healthier communities through cross-sector collaboration, learned about 20 evidence-based factors that, when present, can increase a group’s likelihood of attaining shared goals, and engaged in hands-on exercises to assess their own collaborative initiatives (both those existing and under consideration). This workshop was aimed at improving collaborative knowledge and skills among public health and community development practitioners at all experience levels.

Authors: 
Paul W. Mattessich, PhD, Amherst H. Wilder Foundation; Ela J. Rausch, MPP, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Location by State: 
Population: 

Using the Classification of Laws Associated with School Students (C.L.A.S.S.) Evaluation Tools and Database for Active Living Research and Tracking State Laws for Physical Education and Activity

Date: 
02/26/2013
Description: 

Workshop at the 2013 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

This 75-minute workshop provided an in-depth demonstration of the uses of the C.L.A.S.S. data and tools for evaluation research and policy tracking of state-level laws for physical education and activity in schools. The goal was to increase user awareness of C.L.A.S.S. tools and to provide examples of how these resources and data may be used. The workshop:

  1. Provided an overview of school policy assessment in light of prevailing standards for PE and school nutrition, and demonstrated the C.L.A.S.S. Policy Mapping and State Profile Tools, and research BRIEFS and how they may used for non-academic as well as academic purposes.
  2. Provided research examples of how CLASS has been linked with other data sources for use in multilevel investigations to link state level policy data with school and individual level outcomes.
  3. Familiarized participants to new additions to the database, such as a scoring scheme for state laws governing joint use agreements in schools, and discussed opportunities available from the National Institutes of Health to support research related to School PE and Nutrition Policy.
Authors: 
Frank Perna, EdD, PhD, National Cancer Institute; April Oh, PhD, SAIC-Frederick, Inc.; Erin Hennessy, PhD, National Cancer Institute
Location by State: 

Comprehensive Evaluation of a Multilevel Physical Activity Intervention in Older Adults

Date: 
02/27/2013
Description: 

Presentation at the 2013 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Additional download: Presentation Handout

Abstract: 

Background and Purpose
Ecological models of behavior change posit that individual, interpersonal, environment, & policy factors affect physical activity (PA). MIPARC (Multilevel Intervention for Physical Activity in Retirement Communities) is a group randomized controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of a 12 month multilevel intervention for improving PA in Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) residents. CCRC settings provide an excellent microcosm in which to examine the effects of multi-level interventions. The intervention includes individual, interpersonal, environmental, and policy components. Previous interventions have not targeted all levels of the model. This paper describes the quantitative and qualitative methods employed to evaluate this multilevel PA intervention in older adults.

Description
Residents at 7 intervention CCRCs were given pedometers and logs to track their daily walking. They received progress charts every 2 weeks to track their progress and individual telephone counseling to help them meet their step goals, adapt goals to overcome barriers and on-going health issues, and help participants develop goal setting skills. On the interpersonal level, participants engaged in bi-weekly 90 minute group education sessions led by a qualified health educator for 6 months. In the group sessions, participants were encouraged to share their progress, challenges and successes which provides the opportunity for social support and enhances group cohesion. Participants also attended active events led by a group of “peer leaders” who are active resident who complete training in organizing events. The peer leaders also advocated for environmental projects to improve walkabililty of their site or the surrounding neighborhood. Barriers to walking were identified following an introductory session by the pedestrian community advocacy organization Walk San Diego and action plans were developed to work toward solutions. Example projects included cleaning up a bridge that allowed participants to access a local farmer’s market more easily, redesigning a car park to prevent cars blocking a sidewalk allowing safer walking to a beach, trimming trees that were blocking a sidewalk, increasing pedestrian crossing times at an intersection as well as adding count down timers and auditory prompts. Process measures were used to assess implementation and exposure to all levels of the intervention. Surveys were developed to evaluate the mechanisms of change using validated scales from theoretical constructs, such as group cohesion, as well as scales adapted specifically for our target population. Individual level assessments include: self-efficacy, use of activity locations, satisfaction with facilities, barriers, walking location (self-report and GPS), satisfaction with each intervention component, and satisfaction with peer leaders. Interpersonal measures included: community cohesion, engagement, study group cohesion, social support, peer leader group cohesion, and session/event evaluations. The built environment was assessed through a quantitative audit tool that assesses the PA, educational and social opportunities on site (APARS) and site activity calendars. The policy and environment changes were tracked through progress reports and photo diaries.

Lessons Learned
We will present the evaluation results showing how different data sources can be summarized and patterns across sites investigated. We will demonstrate how qualitative data can be gathered together and given quantitative metrics. Data already demonstrated that attendance at group sessions has been high, 82%, and evaluations extremely positive. The high level of satisfaction however may reflect response bias, making other types of data helpful. The presentation will demonstrate how evaluation using mixed methods is important and what the challenges and solutions are. Case studies of successes and barriers to implementing the community projects and peer led activities will be highlighted. We will use configurational frequency analyses to detect variables occurring more or less frequently than by chance alone. Thresholds for each variable (high vs low) are created based on the numbers that present and the high and low group are compared. This method detects types and anti-types which is a way of indentifying clusters of communities that may share the same underlying systems.

Conclusions and Implications
A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods is necessary to assess community based interventions that use a multi level approach. Multi level interventions require evaluation tools at each level of the intervention, which can be challenging. There are more established quantitative techniques for the individual and interpersonal levels. Evaluating the impact of environmental changes remains difficult due to their diversity. In contrast to individual and interpersonal components that can be prescriptive and thus predictably assessed, environmental projects are context dependent, so measures need to be flexible and case specific. Comparing different projects and summarizing projects across multiple locations involves case study techniques and visual inspection of changes.

Next Steps
Future interventions will be informed by the current research results and we will present a model of an ecological intervention and its evaluation for others to use. We continue to learn the factors, such as local champions, that can result in more effective environmental projects. We also learn from the projects what features are common and may be more predictably measured in future.

Support / Funding Source
This study was funded by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, NIH. R01 HL098425.

Authors: 
Jacqueline Kerr, PhD, Katie Crist, MPH, Simon Marshall, PhD, Dori Rosenberg, PhD, Cynthia Castro, PhD, James Sallis, PhD, Kari Wasilenko, MPH, Khalisa Bolling, MPH, Jacqueline Chen, BS
Location by State: 
Population: 

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