Schools

Show on Home Page: 
Yes

Schools play a critical role in helping children lead active, healthy lives. Recess, PE classes, after-school programs, and walking or biking to and from school all have the potential to get kids moving. Research shows that kids who move more aren’t just healthier, they also tend to do better academically, behave better in class and miss fewer days of school.  Unfortunately, many schools do not offer enough opportunities for children to be active. Policy-makers, teachers and parents can use research on the benefits of school physical activity to advocate for programs and policies that help children be active before, during and after school.

Download our Schools-related Resources Sheet for the best evidence available about a variety of school-based strategies for promoting physical activity.

You can also view and download our The Role of Schools in Promoting Physical Activity infographic.

Show on Audience Block: 
Yes
Topic Image: 
Show on About Page: 
Yes

Getting the Most Bang for Your Buck in Public Health Policy: Using the CHOICES Model for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Childhood Physical Activity Interventions

Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Date: 
02/22/2015
Abstract: 

This workshop explored the CHOICES (CHildhood Obesity Intervention Cost Effectiveness Study) model of cost-effectiveness analysis and lead participants through a process for assessing physical activity policies in meaningful ways for decision makers.  The goal of the CHOICES project is to identify cost-effective interventions that will improve child physical activity and nutrition behaviors, reverse the obesity epidemic, and reduce healthcare costs associated with obesity and inactivity. Using a common set of metrics and the best available scientific evidence, CHOICES is generating cost-effectiveness estimates for 40 childhood obesity prevention interventions in a range of settings where children spend their time.  Workshop presenters walked participants through the step-by-step CHOICES process, demonstrating through examples of physical activity policies how effectiveness, reach (specific populations impacted by an intervention), and cost interact in a cost-effectiveness analysis. With guidance from CHOICES team members, participants developed an intervention specification and logic pathway to evaluate the available evidence for interventions and identify research gaps and defined and enumerated the population reached by the proposed interventions.  After presenters described key principles and processes for identifying the costs associated with interventions, participants worked together in teams to apply these to specific interventions.

Authors: 
Catherine Giles, MPH, Angie Cradock, ScD, & Jessica Barrett, MPH, Harvard School of Public Health Prevention Research Center
Location by State: 

Examining How a Community Coalition Creates and Implements Policy Changes to Promote Physical Activity: The Case of Get Fit Kauai

Date: 
02/25/2015
Description: 

Presentation at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

Background
Get Fit Kauai is the Nutrition and Physical Activity Coalition of Kauai County, a rural island community in Hawaii. Since 2009, Get Fit Kauai has made significant progress in addressing the built environment through multiple policy and program strategies. For example, Get Fit Kauai was instrumental in helping to pass a Complete Streets county resolution, Safe Routes to School state legislation, and, most recently, a change to the county subdivision ordinance that requires sidewalks and shorter block lengths. The purpose of this study is to understand how Get Fit Kauai was able to successfully catalyze policy changes that impact the built environment and what the role of a community coalition is in policy implementation..

Objectives
The primary objective of this study was to gain an understanding of the process through which a community coalition was able to create and implement policy changes that impact the built environment. Secondary objectives of the study included identifying the enabling factors as well as the barriers to policy change and implementation, examining the influence of community context, and determining ways that the coalition could improve its efforts.

Methods
This qualitative study consisted of in-depth interviews with 25 coalition stakeholders. Interview participants were purposefully selected for their unique insights into coalition activities. Interviews were semi-structured, framed by an interview guide, and lasted approximately one hour. A grounded theory approach guided data collection and analysis (Charmaz, 2006). To help validate the interview findings, multiple member checks were conducted (Creswell, 2013), including presenting preliminary results to coalition groups and asking for feedback from interview participants on a draft report. In addition, other data sources such as coalition progress reports, news articles, and policy documents were reviewed to fill in gaps in information obtained from interviews.

Results
Of the 25 interview participants, 52% were women, 64% were at least 45 years old, 56% identified as Caucasian, 48% had a Master’s or other graduate degree, and 68% were involved with the coalition as part of their jobs. Nearly half (44%) worked for county government agencies, including Planning and Public Works.   Participants viewed Get Fit Kauai as critical to achieving the policy changes because of the resources it contributed to capacity building efforts, its activities to increase public awareness of the link between the environment and active lifestyles, and how it coordinated member testimony before County Council. In addition to the policy changes, Get Fit Kauai organized Walk to School Days through its Safe Routes to School Task Force; held annual Mayor-a-thon events in which hundreds of community members celebrated using the coastal path; trained coalition members to lead community planning charrettes; and developed performance measures to track the progress of Complete Streets policy implementation.   One of the major themes to emerge was capacity building, which was seen as an essential first step in the process of policy change. Get Fit Kauai had the resources to hire a progression of national consultants that provided education, training, and targeted technical assistance to the County of Kauai departments and coalition members. The capacity building helped to break down silos between departments and generated support for policy changes. Other contributing factors to policy change were political support from the Mayor and County Council, an effective coalition director, garnering significant local media coverage, and using the Built Environment Task Force as a vehicle for discussion and decision-making for policy strategies.   The community context was mostly supportive of the built environment policy changes. As a small, rural community, people knew each other and cared deeply about preserving the unique character of the island. To overcome a barrier to implementation, one of the identified next steps for Get Fit Kauai was helping to educate communities about the Complete Streets policy and how implementation would not ruin the rural island character.

Conclusions
Get Fit Kauai played a critical role in helping to pass policy changes addressing Complete Streets and Safe Routes to School. For policy implementation, the role of the coalition is evolving into a more supportive one as the county government takes over the lead. Nevertheless, Get Fit Kauai still has meaningful functions to carry out, including community education and holding the county accountable for implementation.

Implications
Other coalitions undertaking similar efforts can learn several lessons from Get Fit Kauai. One of the lessons is to have patience: it will take time to see changes on the ground. Although the County is working hard to implement pilot projects, community members need to understand how long the process takes. Another lesson is that multiple champions are needed at different levels and in different places to keep pushing the work forward. Finally, Get Fit Kauai’s director was identified as the driving force behind the coalition, and other leaders can learn from her approaches in recruiting and motivating people to do the coalition work.

References

  1. Charmaz, K. (2006). Constructing Grounded Theory: A Practical Guide Through Qualitative Analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.
  2. Creswell, J. W. (2013). Qualitative Inquiry & Research Design: Choosing Among Five Approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

 

Support / Funding Source
This study was funded by the Hawaii State Department of Health, Healthy Hawaii Initiative, through Tobacco Settlement Special Funds. Get Fit Kauai is funded by the Healthy Hawaii Initiative and received additional funding through Communities Putting Prevention to Work, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Authors: 
Lehua Choy, MPH, University of Hawaii
Location by State: 
Study Type: 

Assessing Community Readiness for Childhood Obesity Prevention: Findings from Georgia

Date: 
02/25/2015
Description: 

Presentation at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

Background
Communities play a critical role in addressing the childhood overweight and obesity epidemic. Community members, organizations, and governments make the decisions that affect land use, nutrition, marketing, community planning, transportation and ultimately the health status of their residents. Communities provide the context, environment, and opportunity for children to eat well and be physically active (CDC,2009). They are ideally positioned to provide resources, promote behaviors fostering change, and develop effective strategies to promote healthy eating, healthy lifestyles, and healthy weight. Recent research highlights the important role collaboratives can play in promoting physical activity (Litt et al.,2013).  In Georgia, little is known about the number of collaboratives at work or their readiness and capacity to implement evidence-based childhood obesity prevention strategies. In 2012, Georgia State University’s School of Public Health (SPH) partnered with the Georgia Family Connection Partnership (GaFCP) to identify local communities in Georgia that have existing capacity and interest in expanding childhood obesity prevention efforts. SPH and GaFCP assessed community readiness related to the existence of collaboratives, leadership, partnerships, community knowledge, and local resources. This study presents findings on the community readiness of 15 communities engaged in childhood obesity prevention efforts across Georgia.

Objectives
To  identify communities in Georgia that have an interest in expanding childhood obesity prevention efforts and assess their capacity and readiness for future implementation of policies and programs to address childhood obesity.

Methods
The Community Readiness Model (CRM) assesses the capacity to which a community is prepared to address an issue (Plested, Edwards, & Jumper-Thurman, 2006). The CRM has been applied to childhood obesity prevention and used to develop effective, culturally-appropriate, community interventions (Findholt,2007;Sliwa et al.,2011). The model is based on the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change and assesses six dimensions, including existing efforts, community knowledge of efforts, leadership, community climate, community knowledge of issue, and resources available to support efforts. The model includes prevention/intervention strategies for each stage of readiness.  Fifteen collaboratives across Georgia were identified in this study. Collaboratives with moderate to high levels of interest were included.  Collaboratives that existed within the last three years and were previously active were also included. Seventy-nine key informant interviews were conducted (4-6 interviews per collaborative) using a semi-structured questionnaire assessing the six dimensions of readiness. The key informants represented different sectors of the community (e.g., healthcare, education, community organizers, and policymakers). Data were analyzed using qualitative methods and the CRM scoring system. Researchers discussed and reconciled differences in scores and reached consensus for each dimension. An overall stage of readiness score was reached for each collaborative by taking the total of all calculated scores and dividing by the number of dimensions (6).

Results
Overall, total readiness scores ranged from 2.8 to 5.1 out of 9. Ten out of 15 communities scored in the Preplanning stage (clear recognition that something must be done; efforts are not focused or detailed). One community scored in the Denial/Resistance stage (there is little recognition that the problem is occurring locally); two communities scored in the Vague Awareness stage (a local concern, but no immediate motivation to take action); and two communities scored in the Preparation stage (active leaders with modest support of efforts). The average score across all collaboratives for community efforts was 6.3 (Initiation Stage), community knowledge of efforts was 3.5 (Vague Awareness Stage), leadership was 4.6 (Preplanning Stage), community climate was 3.1 (Vague Awareness Stage), community knowledge about the issue was 3.5 (Vague Awareness Stage), resources available was 5.1 (Preparation Stage), and total average score was 4.3 (Preplanning Stage).

Conclusions
In Georgia, only 15 out of 159 counties have established collaboratives dedicated to childhood obesity prevention. Efforts were not always coordinated, widely supported, or adequately publicized.  This was reflected in the lower scores in community climate and community knowledge. While many decisions related to nutrition and physical activity are made at an individual level, this is only one piece of the puzzle.  Individuals can only make healthy decisions when they have the resources, environments, and opportunities to do so.  Communities can respond to the obesity epidemic by creating environments that support healthy eating and encourage physical activity.  Evidence supports the efficacy of community involvement in promoting healthy eating and active living, which ultimately benefits the health of residents. The state has a growing number of communities with interest in childhood obesity prevention and many have expressed a need for support on effective approaches. There is a need for state action to catalyze efforts to support the establishment of additional collaboratives and build capacity to implement childhood obesity prevention programs and policies.

Implications
This study has demonstrated the utility of the CRM for understanding community capacity on childhood obesity prevention. Four of the collaboratives subsequently received grants from the Healthcare Georgia Foundation to implement childhood obesity prevention initiatives. GSU and GaFCP are providing technical assistance for implementation of their childhood obesity prevention policies and programs.

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommended Community Strategies and Measurements to Prevent Obesity in the United States. MMWR 2009;58 (No.RR:07).
  2. Litt JS, Reed HL, Tabak RG, Zieff SG, Eyler AA, Lyn R, et al. Active Living Collaboratives in the United States: Understanding Characteristics, Activities, and Achievement of Environmental and Policy Change. Prev Chronic Dis 2013;10:120162.
  3. Plested B, Edwards R, Jumper-Thurman P. Community readiness: a handbook for successful change. Fort Collins (CO): Tri-Ethnic Center for Prevention Research; 2006.
  4. Findholt N. Application of the community readiness model for childhood obesity prevention. PH Nurs 2007, 24(6):565–570.
  5. Sliwa S, Goldberg JP, Clark V, Collins J, Edwards R, Hyatt RR, et al. Using the community readiness model to select communities for a community-wide obesity prevention intervention. Prev Chronic Dis 2011, 8(6):A150.

Support / Funding Source
The Healthcare Georgia Foundation funded this study.

Authors: 
Erica Sheldon, MPH, Georgia State University
Location by State: 
Population: 

Breaking Tradition: Maximizing Children’s Physical Activity by Modifying Traditional Games with the LET US Play Principles

Date: 
02/24/2015
Description: 

Presentation at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

Background
Standards specifying the amount of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) children should accumulate have been introduced in settings where children spend large amounts of time (e.g., recess, physical education, afterschool programs, summer day camps). Often these settings schedule a finite amount of amount of time for physical activity (PA) opportunities (e.g., 20min recess, 45min lesson, 60min during an afterschool program), and fail to maximize the amount of MVPA children accumulate during. Therefore, many settings that care for children struggle to meet MVPA standards and policies. Strategies which maximize the amount of time children spend in MVPA during scheduled PA opportunities are needed. Targeting staff behaviors and the structure of PA opportunities are two promising strategies for increasing children’s engagement in MVPA. The LET US Play principles, which stands for lines, elimination, team size, uninvolved staff/kids, and space, equipment, and rules, were designed to optimize MVPA levels by modifying games and were established from elements identified as primary barriers to maximizing children’s MVPA during commonly played games. Experimental evidence on the effectiveness of LET US Play to elicit higher levels of MVPA has yet to be established.

Objectives
The objective of this study was to compare the amount of MVPA children accumulate during 6 commonly played games delivered in their traditional format versus the games modified according to the LET US Play principles.

Methods
Children (K-5th grade) were recruited from a single summer day camp. Over 8 weeks, four 1-hour PA sessions were delivered daily on non-consecutive days each week. To avoid issues with temperature, the first session occurred outdoors and included kickball and soccer. The remaining three sessions occurred indoors and included free play, dodgeball, tag games, and relay races. Each 1-hour session was conducted as follows: 5 minutes at the beginning and end for accelerometer placement/removal and demographic data collection, and two 20 minute gameplay segments split by a 10 minute water break. During the 20 minute gameplay segment one of the six games mentioned above were played with children using traditional rules in one 20 minute segment and modifying the rules to adhere to the LET US Play principles in the other 20 minute segment (see Table 1). Each game, modified and traditional versions, was played an equal number of times during the first or second 20 minute segments using a random counterbalanced design. A complete description of the traditional and modified version of each game is presented in Table 1. Approximately 20 children participated in each activity session. Participants wore ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers on the right hip for the duration of each 1-hour activity session with only the two 20 minute segments used for analysis. All statistical analyses were performed using Stata (v.13.1, College Station, TX). Repeated measures mixed effects models were used to estimate differences in the percent of time children spent in MVPA during LET US Play versus traditional PA opportunities. Models were run separately for girls and boys and controlled for age and race.

Results
Over the 8 weeks, 267 children (mean age 7.5 yrs.; 43% girls; 29% African American) participated in 50, 1-hour activity sessions representing 100, 20 minute modified or traditional segments of the activities. The average number of 1-hour sessions was 8.33 (range; 7 kickball – 9 dodgeball, tag games, and relay races). The differences in the number of sessions was due to scheduling conflicts, slow transitions (i.e. a group arriving late to an activity session), and poor weather. For boys, statistically significant increases were found in the percent of time spent in MVPA across all six games incorporating the LET US play principles in comparison to traditional sessions (see Table 2). The largest and smallest MVPA differences for boys were during tag games (20.2%), and free play (8.6%), respectively. For girls, statistical significance was found in 4 out of the 6 games for differences in MVPA (Table 2). The largest was during tag games (20.4%), and smallest during free play (8.3%). Overall, the percentage of children meeting 50% time spent in MVPA increased to 53.1% during dodgeball (largest difference), and to 2.0% during kickball (smallest difference).

Conclusions
The LET US Play principles 1) lead to greater accumulation of MVPA for boys and girls across all 6 types of commonly played games and 2) can increase the percent of children attaining the 50% of time in MVPA standard widely adopted in many settings that care for children.

Implications
Based on these findings, despite best efforts, having all children attain the 50% time in MVPA standard may not be a realistic goal. Thus, the language used in MVPA policies for settings that care for children needs revisiting to identify the most appropriate MVPA goals. Additionally, across settings that care for children, training and support for adults in the LET US Play principles, is needed.

Authors: 
Keith Brazendale, MS, University of South Carolina
Location by State: 
Study Type: 

Contributions of Neighborhood Street Scale Elements to Physical Activity in Mexican School Children

Date: 
02/24/2015
Description: 

Presentation at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

Background
Residence in neighborhoods where streets are safe, attractive, and connected has been related to physical activity (PA).[1,2] Research has focused more on adults and has been conducted in high income countries.[3] This relationship is as yet undocumented in most low and middle income countries, such as Mexico, an emerging influence on North American countries, and burdened with the highest childhood obesity rate in the world. Specific types of environmental factors might influence particular types of PA (eg, recreational, transportation) differently;[4] however, many of these findings are based on perceived or resident self-reported environmental variables with few studies using objective, in-person audits of the environment.

Objectives
This study investigated the relationship of objectively assessed street scale data with PA among Mexican children.

Methods
Neighborhoods were an 800 meter radial buffer circumscribed[5] around public schools selected by the State of Jalisco Secretary of Education (Guadalajara n=12; Puerto Vallarta n=5) or from another study of policy implementation in Mexico (Mexico City n=18). Trained American and Mexican field assessors measured5 25% of residential and all arterial street segments[3] within the radial buffer were coded using an adapted version of the Pedestrian Environment Data Scan.[6] Traffic buffers (eg, fence, trees, grass), path connections, traffic control devices, traffic lanes, crossing aids, amenities (eg, benches, trash cans, street vendors), bicycle facilities and traffic speed limit were measured to represent street scale features. Assessments were conducted in teams of at least 2 people following established data collection and safety protocols.[5, 6]   Mexican school children participated in a multisite investigation of neighborhood and health in Mexican school children in Guadalajara (n=804), Mexico City (n=703) and Puerto Vallarta (n=207) in 2012. Demographic characteristics of child’s age, gender, and the number of children in the home and PA were measured using a translated version of the 4th grade School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) survey that was distributed to parents for completion.[7] Parents completed items measuring the days of outdoor play, participation on sports teams (yes/no) and participation in other organized PA (yes/no).[8] Children provided assent and parents provided consent following approved IRB protocols.   Descriptive, bivariable analyses were conducted using correlation, t, one-way ANOVA or Chi Square tests. Initial bivariable associations (correlations) conducted for PEDS variables determined high multicollinearity; therefore, each PEDS variable was tested in a separate model for each of the three PA outcomes. Street segment data were aggregated to the neighborhood level by taking the mean across street segments for each neighborhood, using established protocols for ecologic analyses.[9] Hierarchical regression models were used to estimate the effect of aggregated environmental factors on individual days played outside, and hierarchical logistic regression models were used to determine associations with participation in sports teams and other organized physical activities. All models were controlled for individual child age, gender, number of children in household, and city of residence.

Results
The sample (M=9.6±1.0 years) was nearly evenly divided by gender (n=817 boys, 46.9%; n= 924 girls, 53.1%), with an average of 2.5±1.6 children per household. On average, parents reported that their child played outdoors for 30 minutes about twice a week (M=2.4±2.3), nearly half participated in at least one sports team (n=619, 47.2%) and over one third participated in other organized physical activities (n=566, 40.6%). Gender was consistently associated with PA participation, with girls spending fewer days playing outdoors (m=2.1±2.1 vs.  m=2.6±2.3, p

Conclusions
Outdoor play may occur on streets with fewer street elements that focus on pedestrian safety and comfort (buffers, connectivity, crossing aids, amenities), on streets that may have less traffic (fewer lanes, control devices). Perhaps these are quieter streets with less traffic and fewer pedestrian enhancements. Participation in sports and other organized activities was related to few neighborhood variables. Participating in other organized activities was associated with having more children in the household (not shown). Perhaps participation in extracurricular activities is driven by time and access to resources.

Implications
The lower levels of participation in play, sports and other activities suggest that strategies at all levels are needed to increase PA among Mexican children. Increasing access to safe and pleasant areas in neighborhoods may help to increase PA.

References

  1. Giles-Corti B, Donovan RJ. Relative influences of individual, social environmental, and physical environmental correlates of walking. Am J Public Health. 2003;93:1583–9.
  2. Handy SL, Boarnet MG, Ewing R, Killingsworth RE. How the built environment affects physical activity: views from urban planning. Am J Prev Med. 2002;23:64–73.
  3. Giles-Corti B, Kelty SF, Zubrick SR, Villanueva KP. Encouraging walking for transport and physical activity in children and adolescents: how important is the built environment? Sports Med. 2009;39(12):995-1009. doi: 10.2165/11319620-000000000-00000. Review. PubMed PMID: 19902982. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19902982.
  4. Cain KL, Millstein RA, Sallis JF, Conway TL, Gavand KA, Frank LD, Saelens BE, Geremia CM, Chapman J, Adams MA, Glanz K, King AC. Contribution of streetscape audits to explanation of physical activity in four age groups based on the Microscale Audit of Pedestrian Streetscapes (MAPS). Soc Sci Med. 2014 Sep;116:82-92. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.06.042. Epub 2014 Jun 24. PubMed PMID: 24983701.
  5. Lee RE, Booth KM, Reese-Smith JY, Regan G, Howard HH. The Physical Activity Resource Assessment (PARA) instrument: evaluating features, amenities and incivilities of physical activity resources in urban neighborhoods. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2005 Sep 14;2:13. PubMed PMID: 16162285; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1262748.
  6. McMillan TE, Cubbin C, Parmenter B, Medina AV, Lee RE. Neighborhood sampling: how many streets must an auditor walk? Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2010 Mar 12;7:20. doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-7-20. PubMed PMID: 20226052; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3224902.
  7. Thiagarajah K, Fly AD, Hoelscher DM, Bai Y, Lo K, Leone A, Shertzer JA. Validating the food behavior questions from the elementary school SPAN questionnaire. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2008 Sep-Oct;40(5):305-10. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2007.07.004. PubMed PMID: 18725149.
  8. Penkilo M, George GC, Hoelscher DM. Reproducibility of the School-Based Nutrition Monitoring Questionnaire among fourth-grade students in Texas. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2008 Jan-Feb;40(1):20-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2007.04.375. PubMed PMID: 18174100.
  9. Heinrich KM, Lee RE, Suminski RR, Regan GR, Reese-Smith JY, Howard HH, Haddock CK, Poston WS, Ahluwalia JS. Associations between the built environment and physical activity in public housing residents. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2007;4:56.

 

Support / Funding Source
This work made possible by a Fulbright-García Robles Core Scholar Fellowship awarded to Dr. Lee, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Authors: 
Rebecca Lee, PhD, Arizona State University
Location by State: 
Population: 
Study Type: 

Influencing Active Living Policy and Practice: How Can I Improve My Pitch?

Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Date: 
02/22/2015
Abstract: 

Researchers are often disappointed or frustrated that their research is ignored by policy-makers and practitioners. This partly stems from ‘the gap’ between researchers and policy-makers and a lack of understanding of the policy-making process. The aim of this workshop was to assist participants to understand how to better ‘pitch’ their ideas and research to active living decision-makers:  bureaucrats, practitioners and politicians. Workshop participants were invited to write a letter or email to a policy-makers, practitioner or bureaucrat requesting an opportunity to meet to discuss an issue, an opportunity for a collaboration, and/or a need for policy-reform. The letters were reviewed and all participants received feedback on their written communication. Four participants were also invited to present a five minute ‘pitch’. After receiving feedback, workshop participants worked together in four teams to discuss and distill key lessons about how a future pitch could be improved to achieve one’s goal.

Download the summary notes from the workshop: Strategies for an Effective Pitch

Authors: 
Billie Giles-Corti, PhD, McCaughey VicHealth Centre for Community Wellbeing, The University of Melbourne; Peter McCue, Executive Officer, NSW Premier's Council for Active Living, Sydney, Australia; Tracy Delaney, PhD, Public Health Alliance of Southern California; William Fulton, Kinder Institute for Urban Research, Rice University
Location by State: 
Population: 

Systematic Observation of Physical Activity using iSOPARC: An iPad Application for Research and Practice, 2015

Date: 
02/22/2015
Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

This two-part workshop focused on data collection in community settings using the direct observation SOPARC (System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities) and provided practice for using iSOPARC – an innovative iPad application for collecting and storing SOPARC data. In addition to standard SOPARC data on physical activity, iSOPARC permits the collection and exportation of photos, and enables the identification, mapping, and spatial area calculation of target areas using the iPad’s GPS technology. Workshop participants learned the basic operation of iSOPARC and how the application can be used for large and small research projects. The first part of the workshop focused on the SOPARC approach for data collection on physical activity an area characteristics, followed by an introduction on the use of the iSOPARC application for iPads. Participants were taught the basic functions of iSOPARC using video examples of various physical activity settings.  Participants experienced real-life data collection using iSOPARC in outdoor settings. Following data collection practice, participants viewed their data in real time by uploading their observations.

Authors: 
Troy Carlton, MS, MBA, North Carolina State University; Thomas McKenzie, PhD, San Diego State University; Luis Suau, PhD, Shaw University
Location by State: 
Study Type: 

Engaging the Research Community in Accelerating Policy Change

Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Date: 
02/22/20015
Abstract: 

This training provided an overview of the latest in childhood obesity issue advocacy at the state and community levels as well as provided concrete steps for engagement by researchers who want to connect as advocates.  Specific topics included: 1). Defining advocacy and understanding the role of issue advocacy in building a reversing the childhood obesity epidemic, including how to achieve public health impact through public policy change and the difference between advocacy and lobbying. 2). Introducing Voices for Healthy Kids, including an overview of the approach and policy priorities. 3). Overview of the principles of effective issue advocacy campaigns using the Power Prism® model, including: Research and data collection (small group hands-on activity:  Conducting key informant interviews); Coalition building and maintenance; Grassroots and key contacts; Media advocacy (independent and paired hands-on activity:  developing your persuasive message using the 27-9-3 framework; Key decision-maker advocacy (Pathways of Influence); Fundraising and Development. 4). Discussion on the engagement of the research community in policy change.

Authors: 
Jill Birnbaum, JD, Sally Wong, PhD, RD, CDN, & Debbie Hornor, BA, Voices for Health Kids American Heart Association
Location by State: 

Community Commons: A National Data, Mapping and Reporting Platform to Support Policy Implementation

Date: 
02/22/2015
Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

A wealth of data is readily available from Federal and State Data Warehouses for communities across the United States; however, many organizations often lack the time, expertise, or technological infrastructure to make the best use of data resources for policy implementation. Community Commons, which is an evolving interactive mapping, networking, and learning utility for the broad-based healthy, sustainable, livable communities movement, strives to overcome these constraints by providing easy-to-use, democratized access to data, GIS-generated maps, and reporting tools. This workshop highlighted two Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded Community Commons Hubs: The Childhood Obesity GIS (COGIS) and the Salud America! Growing Healthy Change Hub that includes a policy-mapping tool.

Authors: 
Chris Fulcher, PhD, CARES-University of Missouri; Roxanne Median-Fulcher, JD, Institute for People, Place and Possibility (IP3)
Location by State: 
Population: 
Study Type: 

Getting Them To Listen: Tools for Community and Decision Maker Engagement

Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Date: 
02/22/2015
Abstract: 

Building community champions and getting funding are crucial for change.  In order to do so, both researchers and practitioners must engage all of the stakeholders. This workshop provided a strong overview of many community engagement tools, along with an exercise and action plan outline for helping attendees determine their approach for any given outreach or planning effort. Through small group activity and individual action planning templates, participants learned how to determine best outreach, engagement, and communication strategies given their own particular research or planning efforts. In person participatory, surveying, and web-based interactive methods were reviewed.

Authors: 
Teresa Penbrooke, MAOM, CPRE, North Carolina State University, GP RED, and GreenPlay LLC
Location by State: 
Population: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Schools