Practitioners

Urban planners, public health leaders and business owners can all help people be active in their neighborhoods. Teachers, principals and school district directors can help children be active before, during and after school. Relying on evidence-based strategies in your work will help you be as effective as possible. Active Living Research has resources to provide practitioners with guidance on promising approaches for preventing obesity and promoting physical activity.

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Influencing Active Living Policy and Practice: How Can I Improve My Pitch?

Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Date: 
02/22/2015
Abstract: 

Researchers are often disappointed or frustrated that their research is ignored by policy-makers and practitioners. This partly stems from ‘the gap’ between researchers and policy-makers and a lack of understanding of the policy-making process. The aim of this workshop was to assist participants to understand how to better ‘pitch’ their ideas and research to active living decision-makers:  bureaucrats, practitioners and politicians. Workshop participants were invited to write a letter or email to a policy-makers, practitioner or bureaucrat requesting an opportunity to meet to discuss an issue, an opportunity for a collaboration, and/or a need for policy-reform. The letters were reviewed and all participants received feedback on their written communication. Four participants were also invited to present a five minute ‘pitch’. After receiving feedback, workshop participants worked together in four teams to discuss and distill key lessons about how a future pitch could be improved to achieve one’s goal.

Download the summary notes from the workshop: Strategies for an Effective Pitch

Authors: 
Billie Giles-Corti, PhD, McCaughey VicHealth Centre for Community Wellbeing, The University of Melbourne; Peter McCue, Executive Officer, NSW Premier's Council for Active Living, Sydney, Australia; Tracy Delaney, PhD, Public Health Alliance of Southern California; William Fulton, Kinder Institute for Urban Research, Rice University
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Systematic Observation of Physical Activity using iSOPARC: An iPad Application for Research and Practice, 2015

Date: 
02/22/2015
Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

This two-part workshop focused on data collection in community settings using the direct observation SOPARC (System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities) and provided practice for using iSOPARC – an innovative iPad application for collecting and storing SOPARC data. In addition to standard SOPARC data on physical activity, iSOPARC permits the collection and exportation of photos, and enables the identification, mapping, and spatial area calculation of target areas using the iPad’s GPS technology. Workshop participants learned the basic operation of iSOPARC and how the application can be used for large and small research projects. The first part of the workshop focused on the SOPARC approach for data collection on physical activity an area characteristics, followed by an introduction on the use of the iSOPARC application for iPads. Participants were taught the basic functions of iSOPARC using video examples of various physical activity settings.  Participants experienced real-life data collection using iSOPARC in outdoor settings. Following data collection practice, participants viewed their data in real time by uploading their observations.

Authors: 
Troy Carlton, MS, MBA, North Carolina State University; Thomas McKenzie, PhD, San Diego State University; Luis Suau, PhD, Shaw University
Location by State: 
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Using Technology for Community-based Advocacy and Environmental Change: The Community Park Audit Tool App

Date: 
02/22/2015
Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

This workshop provided participants with an overview of the Community Park Audit Tool (eCPAT) app and its utility in advocacy and community change efforts. The first segment of the workshop included an overview of research on advocacy, technology and civic engagement, and parks and physical activity. Part 2 consisted of an introduction to the eCPAT, including its development and content. Part 3 included onsite use of the eCPAT and debriefing in a local park. The final part of the workshop was an interactive discussion about how the eCPAT and similar tools can be used for advocacy and environmental change to promote public health.

Authors: 
Gina M. Besenyi, MPH, University of South Carolina; Sonja A. Wilhelm Stanis, PhD, University of Missouri; Andrew T. Kaczynski, PhD, University of South Carolina; Travis Smith, PhD, National Recreation and Park Assocaiton
Population: 
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Community Commons: A National Data, Mapping and Reporting Platform to Support Policy Implementation

Date: 
02/22/2015
Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

A wealth of data is readily available from Federal and State Data Warehouses for communities across the United States; however, many organizations often lack the time, expertise, or technological infrastructure to make the best use of data resources for policy implementation. Community Commons, which is an evolving interactive mapping, networking, and learning utility for the broad-based healthy, sustainable, livable communities movement, strives to overcome these constraints by providing easy-to-use, democratized access to data, GIS-generated maps, and reporting tools. This workshop highlighted two Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded Community Commons Hubs: The Childhood Obesity GIS (COGIS) and the Salud America! Growing Healthy Change Hub that includes a policy-mapping tool.

Authors: 
Chris Fulcher, PhD, CARES-University of Missouri; Roxanne Median-Fulcher, JD, Institute for People, Place and Possibility (IP3)
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Getting Them To Listen: Tools for Community and Decision Maker Engagement

Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Date: 
02/22/2015
Abstract: 

Building community champions and getting funding are crucial for change.  In order to do so, both researchers and practitioners must engage all of the stakeholders. This workshop provided a strong overview of many community engagement tools, along with an exercise and action plan outline for helping attendees determine their approach for any given outreach or planning effort. Through small group activity and individual action planning templates, participants learned how to determine best outreach, engagement, and communication strategies given their own particular research or planning efforts. In person participatory, surveying, and web-based interactive methods were reviewed.

Authors: 
Teresa Penbrooke, MAOM, CPRE, North Carolina State University, GP RED, and GreenPlay LLC
Location by State: 
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Technology Tools for K-12 Community Use: Cost Calculator

Date: 
02/22/2015
Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

Data about public school facilities and a vision for equitable access to great school environments drives the work of the 21st Century School Fund (21CSF) and the Center for Cities and Schools (CC+S). In this work shop, participants had an opportunity to see how we link the data, analysis, technology tools and policy and practice reforms. Participants worked with one of the tools--the Joint Use Cost Calculator--and with data supporting this tool, and learn how it can affect policy and practice. The workshop begin with a short presentation on the theory of change used and tested over 20 years at the 21CSF; and used and tested at the CC+S over the last 10 years. Following this presentation; participants learned to work with the Joint use Cost Calculator and explored its use in advancing policy and practice change associated with community use of public school buildings and grounds.

Authors: 
Jeff Vincent, PhD, UC Berkeley Center for Cities and Schools
Location by State: 
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Maximizing Out-of-School Time: Empowering Afterschool Providers to Create Healthier Communities

Due to the number of US children who attend various types of afterschool care, it is becoming increasingly clear that out-of-school time staff can play an essential role in helping young people eat healthy and stay active. In order to effectively implement programs and policies that advance wellness, however, afterschool staff need high quality tools and resources. This session will outline the value of afterschool care, and provide specific ideas to help make out-of-school time programs part of an effective strategy to help children eat better and move more.

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