Educators

Research shows that healthy, active students perform better—and behave better—in the classroom. Our resources can help educators understand and advocate for promising strategies to prevent obesity and promote physical activity in our nation’s schools.

Our resources also can help inform interdisciplinary courses and training classes that are focused on the intersection of public health and planning, transportation, or parks and recreation. Educating practitioners about the most effective approaches for creating healthy communities is critical for reversing the childhood obesity epidemic.

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Technology Tools for K-12 Community Use: Cost Calculator

Date: 
02/22/2015
Description: 

Workshop at the 2015 Active Living Research Annual Conference.

Abstract: 

Data about public school facilities and a vision for equitable access to great school environments drives the work of the 21st Century School Fund (21CSF) and the Center for Cities and Schools (CC+S). In this work shop, participants had an opportunity to see how we link the data, analysis, technology tools and policy and practice reforms. Participants worked with one of the tools--the Joint Use Cost Calculator--and with data supporting this tool, and learn how it can affect policy and practice. The workshop begin with a short presentation on the theory of change used and tested over 20 years at the 21CSF; and used and tested at the CC+S over the last 10 years. Following this presentation; participants learned to work with the Joint use Cost Calculator and explored its use in advancing policy and practice change associated with community use of public school buildings and grounds.

Authors: 
Jeff Vincent, PhD, UC Berkeley Center for Cities and Schools
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Study Type: 

Maximizing Out-of-School Time: Empowering Afterschool Providers to Create Healthier Communities

Due to the number of US children who attend various types of afterschool care, it is becoming increasingly clear that out-of-school time staff can play an essential role in helping young people eat healthy and stay active. In order to effectively implement programs and policies that advance wellness, however, afterschool staff need high quality tools and resources. This session will outline the value of afterschool care, and provide specific ideas to help make out-of-school time programs part of an effective strategy to help children eat better and move more.

How Can Schools Help Youth Increase Physical Activity? An Economic Analysis Comparing School-Based Programs

Date: 
12/01/2014
Description: 

Babey, S. H., Wu, S., & Cohen, D. A. (2014). How Can Schools Help Youth Increase Physical Activity? An Economic Analysis Comparing School-Based Programs. Preventive Medicine, 69(Suppl), S55-S60.

Abstract: 

OBJECTIVE: For optimal health, physical activity should be an integral and routine part of daily life. Youth spend a significant amount of time at school yet rarely achieve the recommended 60 min of moderate and vigorous physical activity in physical education (PE) classes or recess. This study assessed the following types of school-based opportunities to improve physical activity for youth: after-school programs, before-school programs, PE classes, extended-day PE, and short physical activity breaks during the school day. METHOD: An economic analysis conducted in 2013 compared school-based approaches to increasing physical activity. Analysis factors included costs, reach, effects on physical activity gains, cost-effectiveness, and other potentially augmenting benefits. RESULTS: Two programs were significantly superior in terms of reach and cost per student: (1) extending the school day with mandatory PE participation and (2) offering short (10-minute) physical activity breaks during regular classroom hours. After-school program costs per student are high and the programs have a smaller reach, but they offer benefits (such as childcare) that may justify their higher costs. Before-school programs did not appear feasible. CONCLUSION: Incorporating short physical activity breaks into the existing school day would be a cost-effective way to increase school-based activity. This type of program is inexpensive and has broad reach. Inserting activity breaks throughout the day is appropriate, especially when youth are otherwise largely sedentary.

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